Hello! This blog is about my daughter Hailey (currently 12 years old) and her experiences living with auditory processing disorder. Auditory Processing Disorder is Hailey's primary issue, however she has also been given the labels Sensory Processing Disorder, Dyslexia, Visual Processing Disorder, Mixed Expressive Receptive Language Disorder and Phonology Disorder at various points in her life.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Slide Presentation in Common Language on What Auditory Processing Disorder Is (for your friends, family, teachers, etc.)


My dear friend Lynda Waller whom is also co-author of the book Same Journey Different Paths; Stories of Auditory Processing Disorder, created this fantastic slide presentation for auditory processing disorder (also known as central auditory processing disorder).  I hope you find it as beneficial as I do.























7 comments:

  1. This was very timely because I have a CAPD evaluation coming up for my 7-yr old. Thanks for the info.

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    1. You're welcome. I'm glad you like it. I'll be sure to tell Lynda; she did a phenomenal job. :)

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  2. WOW, best description and helpful info that I have seen yet! Thanks

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  3. :) Yay! Lynda really appreciates the compliment.

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  4. Do you have any suggestions to help athletes with APD and coaches? Your slide for classroom support was great but how do you help on the hockey field or the swimming pool?

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    1. I think a lot of the same principles apply; maybe the coach can use visuals and makes sure the athlete with APD can see his/her face when talking. When the coach is speaking, other noises like teammates talking should be discouraged as well. Time for processing also needs to be allowed whereby the coach lets the athlete have some time to think before responding. I think during the game/meet that hand signals could be very useful - like they use in baseball. For the younger kids in particular, a coach needs to realize that the short term auditory memory is often limited in people with APD and so requiring the athlete to memorize names of positions (as in baseball) or complex verbal instructions is asking too much; it's not that it can't be done, but it might require more time, a kinesthetic or visual approach to learning it (actually going to each position on the field in order to remember the name or doing each step of the verbal direction while memorizing it over and over again in order to get it into the memory via another path other than just auditory). I hope this helps in some way; there really isn't a lot of research or information out there on coaching athletes with APD.

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  5. I love APD! This was a very encouraging and helpful read. Thank you so much!

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